OOC Commentary

This topic contains 21 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  M.J. 3 months ago.

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  • #4679

    The Bearded Belgian
    Participant

    Hey guys,

    I used to enjoy the out of character commentary threads that featured on Gaming Outpost for the games that were run. There was a “behind the screen” thread in which Mark showed us what he was doing, basically learning us to play the game, but at one point there was also a “Peanut Gallery” I think I remember, I think set up by Kyler, for non-technical banter about the games that were running. Would it be an idea to have the latter here again? Since I do like to throw in my two cents once in a while, but don’t want to interrupt a game thread itself with it. That would be bad form, right?

    Anyway, with current games starting up I have some things where I had some thoughts about.

    Tristan: The beginning of that game reminds me of the Japanese fairy tale of the moon princess, which has been beautifully animated by Studio Ghibli as The Tale of Princess Kaguya. As in, a childless couple find a child in the forest. They always wanted a kid, but were barren, so they decided to adopt this kid, as a gift of the gods (who live on the moon or something). Just wanted to throw that out there in case it could provide extra inspiration to the GM. There are notable differences though, as Tristan is clearly not a baby they found in the hollow stem of a bamboo shoot.

    Ahmetia: The impressionists were, like many more modern painters, not appreciated in their times themselves. They had their own subculture and would hold their own salons, undeterred by being cast out from official musea. As such, it seems strange to me that Matisse would hang in the museum. Then again, maybe in this ‘verse’ the impressionists were celebrated or tolerated instead of shunned? Also, it is genre appropriate for the “romantic story in a historical setting” type story it is, which is it’s own strong point. I’m just a bit of an art snob.

    Oak: On Christianity in Europe. Depending on when exactly the story is set the standard Christian faith was indeed Catholicism, but starting from 1054 there was the great Eastern Schism, making the Eastern Orthodox brand of Christianity the other grand contender. Further more there were, as Mark said, quite a few ‘heresies’ that were persecuted and never had the benefit of the printing press to spread their ideas far and wide quickly. Two major ones among them being the gnostics and the Cathars, neither of which I think Oak would find himself agreeing with.

  • #4686

    M.J.
    Keymaster

    Good idea, Nikolaj.

    On the art museum, yeah, I realized that Matisse was unlikely to be featured in a museum in the late 1890s, but my art history is weak and I recently encountered two sources that dealt some with art in that period (one, the movie Midnight in Paris, the other a book entitled Swan Thieves). I’m afraid I’m not sure who the last group of well-known artists before that were (I’m afraid I can’t distinguish Rembrandt from Renoir) so I went with the fact that Paris is full of art museums, this isn’t one of the major ones, and someone would be displaying at least some of the more prominent “contemporary” (at the time) artists. I chose Matisse because I was pretty sure he was current in the 1890s and popular enough that he was probably known. Besides, I remembered him from that brief 1890s scene in that movie.

    Concerning Christianity in Europe in 1200, my placement of the Waldegenses or however it’s spelled is a guess, but an educated one. I’m pretty sure they predated Wycliffe, who is my anchor here–latter half of twelve hundreds, half a century or so after the 1190s in which Oak finds himself. But it’s not a major point, only the suggestion that Tuck has heard of divergent groups.

    –M

  • #4715

    borrowbreadcat
    Participant

    I think I do remember that story, Mister Belgian. You’re right, very similar! And I do love some classic japanese lore. I’m really interested to see where this goes. I guess it could be like historically accurate Meiji era stuff.

    You’re right. There are some important differences. no just like in the story you’re referring to, the child in this story is also not of this world:-)

  • #4719

    M.J.
    Keymaster

    I apologize for missing everyone yesterday. My rather unbalanced digestive tract has me constantly wondering whether I am hungry or nauseated, and yesterday I got very little accomplished. Hopefully I’m ready today.

    Hey, Nikolaj–my wife has been watching this series about a couple of bakers who are bikers, who have of late been motorcycling all over Europe and discovering the best baked goods in each country. That part’s kind of interesting, but the thing that caught my attention has nothing to do with breads, cakes, or even chocolate. There is a way of making an internationally popular side dish which Americans call French Fried Potatoes (because they’re sliced and deep fat fried, and we call deep fat frying “French”, including that we once had something called “French Fried Onion Rings” which are sliced, separated, and batter-dipped before frying in oil, but are now called “onion rings” and are often made of diced and formed onions with filler–more info than you need) or sometimes just French Fries or even just fries, which the English call “Chips” (and what we call “chips” they call “crisps”), but which you call, I think, “Frittes”, or something like that. In America the traditional way to eat them is with catsup, also called ketchup, but American catsup is made of tomato paste (it’s modeled on a Japanese condiment that’s made from fish paste). A couple decades ago it became popular to eat them slathered with gooey cheese sauce, and then more recently with chili or chili and cheese, and within the past couple years cheese and bacon. In England I gather they eat them with salt and vinegar (and my kids have been known to squeeze the juice from dill pickles on them). But I understand that the norm in Belgium is to eat them slathered in mayonnaise (that white creamy stuff made of oil and beaten egg white). Any truth to that? Or is that just one option?

    There is nothing historical about Tristan’s current world except that I’m using historic names for the nobility and one version of the ninja. It’s not even in an historic time period–it’s twentieth century, but the technology is horded by the nobles. He’s already seen a motortrike, so he should know this.

    –M

  • #4723

    The Bearded Belgian
    Participant

    Yes. Mayo all the way down. Most popular condiment, followed by Tomato Ketchup (which has two varieties, regular, and curry), but there’s a whole slew of popular, uniquely Belgian sauces. Still, mayo is king of the condiments over here. There’s basically two variants: with or without lemon used in the mix.

    Also an interesting variant is “special” sause, which is Mayo, Ketchup (tomato or curry) and chopped, raw onion. It’s a mess, it’s a heart attack waiting to happen, but it’s sooooo gooood :)

  • #4727

    M.J.
    Keymaster

    I gather that curry is popular in England, probably imported from the time they spent ruling India (which I gather is its origin). There isn’t much curry in America–you have to go out of your way to find it. Someone served me curry when I was in college, but I really did not like it at all; I’m not that big on hot food, although I can tolerate some hot Italian dishes and moderately hot Chinese ones. Chili is the more common here, coming up from Mexico and the southwest. I’m not really big on that, either (I joke that I think the phrase “Mexican food” is an oxymoron), although I make a sweet chili with only a bit of chili powder and a good dose of brown sugar which some of my sons love but my wife hates–she does like hot food, although I’m not sure it always likes her.

    I think I have seen mayo with lemon on the shelves, but never had it. “Special sauce” in America is the stuff McDonald’s puts on its Big Mac sandwiches, and is usually thought to be simple Thousand Island Dressing (essentially straight tomato catsup with mayo and sweet pickle relish, but there are arguments about whether it’s the same or not, complicated by the fact that you can only get special sauce on the burger so you can’t easily compare it). My wife dips a lot of meats in Thousand Island dressing, and sometimes other things. I usually put catsup and mayo on my burgers, but she usually does catsup only.

    –M

  • #4736

    The Bearded Belgian
    Participant

    This time tomorrow I will be on an airplane to Moscow. I’ll have to wait there for about four hours before I take the next plane to Seoul. Depending on wether or not I find wifi (and how awake I will be) I might not post tomorrow. Just as a heads up.

  • #4741

    M.J.
    Keymaster

    Wait a minute–Seoul? As in South Korea? What are you going to be doing there?

    –M

  • #4748

    The Bearded Belgian
    Participant

    Yes. I somehow ended up with possibly the longest long distance relation possible. Visiting my girlfriend. :)

  • #4750

    M.J.
    Keymaster

    And I thought Boston to Philadelphia was rough.

    Is she from Seoul, or visiting, or transplanted?

    How did you meet?

    –M

  • #4751

    The Bearded Belgian
    Participant

    She’s from Wisconsin. She’s an expat there, teaching kids in English School.

    We met through a mutual facebook friend. What was just an acquaintance grew into a friendship, which grew into a solid friendship, which grew into a if-we-weren’t-this-far-apart-we-would-totally-try-a-date to us actually professing love to each other before even having met in person. This is all in about 11 years time I think.

    God’s providence is unexpected sometimes. He moves in mysterious ways for sure. We first actually met face to face last year around this time.

  • #4779

    M.J.
    Keymaster

    I have been rather debilitated most of the past week. I am showing improvement last night and today, and attempting to get back on track; the forums have come to the top of the list.

    –M

  • #4783

    The Bearded Belgian
    Participant

    Take care! If there are specific things I can pray for, don’t hesitate to share them, either here or through more private means.

  • #5344

    The Bearded Belgian
    Participant

    Appearently games are back on the menu and I didn’t realize it! Sorry for the long absence!

  • #5347

    M.J.
    Keymaster

    I’m not sure they were ever officially off the menu, although 2020 had me in and out of hospitals quite a bit.

    I was going to say it was funny that I just mentioned this forum somewhere, but then, you probably saw it there. But it’s late and I have an early morning, so I’m going to beg your indulgence and try to get to your game post tomorrow.

    –M. J. Young

  • #5348

    The Bearded Belgian
    Participant

    Yes, I saw it elsewhere and decided to check things out again. 2020 had me busy as well though, so I’m not sure how active I would have been.

  • #5349

    M.J.
    Keymaster

    Strangely, I posted to this thread and the accompanying game thread yesterday, late, but neither post seems to have appeared.

    Consider this a test post; if it works, I’ll push forward, and if it doesn’t I’ll have to do some investigating.

    –M

  • #5351

    M.J.
    Keymaster

    O.K., trying again. A bit disappointed, because I was kind of happy with what I’d posted yesterday and I don’t remember it all, but nothing I can do about it now.

    I enjoy the difficult philosophical issues, but they can slow a game, so I’ll see if I can click this one forward a bit without ending it but without locking it in place.

    And sorry for the technical delay.

    –M

  • #5353

    The Bearded Belgian
    Participant

    No worries. The forum seems to have the technical issues it did before, where I have to refresh every time to see wether or not you posted, since it won’t show it if I just click the link.

  • #5355

    M.J.
    Keymaster

    For what it’s worth, Nikolaj, the entire site seems to do that to me, and I routinely reload every page I visit when I arrive.

    I’m trying to wrap up the slavery issue conversation, but there is another aspect to it.

    I had to look back through the thread to recover the name of the fiance, Katarina. (I actually used a mnemonic for that, as that’s the name of someone I know whom I am using as a rough template for the character, although I do not know her very well. That would be Ahmetia’s sister.)

    –M. J. Young

  • #5358

    M.J.
    Keymaster

    Working on mentally reconstructing Katarina, I recall that she is the daughter of the owner of the ranch, became a believer probably several months ago and has become involved in helping lead the small congregation at the ranch (which is a large concern involving quite a few hired hands and orc slaves), and much more recently agreed to marry Nikolaj despite his uncertainties about the future.

    I should roll a GE for progress in other areas, but I’m not sure I know what they all are so despite the fact that my dice cube is within reach I’ll let him give me some direction for the thread.

    –M

  • #5364

    M.J.
    Keymaster

    I’m posting mostly to say I was here and saw Nikolaj’s post. Thank you for that–I was starting to worry that I’d lost you. Take your time.

    –M

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A generalist: learning less and less about more and more, one day to know nothing about everything.